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important element, the u.n. dimension: respect for the territorial integrity and independence of iraq. so that meant that the action team could not go to nondeclared facilities. only delareed facilities could be -- declared facilities could be inspected. but then the security council formed out that right to, i would say, break the integrity to the -- [inaudible] so they were charged with nondeclared facilities and activities. of course, then it was, obviously, chemical, biological. but the beauty of these wars that it's tough sanctions system was in place. we have to have that also. but immediately when the inspection started, the sanction system was gradually released. so this was a functioning system, good behavior led also to these single sanctions. bad behavior, which happened, of course, quite frequently, some blockages and refusals, was met by some tough language from the security council. not from the israeli government or anyone, it was security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. so, of course, we know that this system works extremely well. it
right now in a new round of senate meetings for u.n. susan rice. she is going back after yesterday, it didn't go so well, she is going back. she will answer questions about the white house response to the consulate attack in benge, libya on 9/11 of this year. many political observers think she is trying to win supporters for a possible nomination of secretary of state. she would have to be confirmed in the senate. senator bob corker earlier said miss rice's statements may prove she is too political. the meeting between susan collins, she expressed concerns too. she is not known as a republican fire brand but she expressed concerns. these meetings come a day after three top republicans said they were more concerned about libya now after meeting with rice than ever before. here is senator collins a short time ago. >> i asked ambassador rice why she did not qualify her comments more, in light of this contradictory reporting from the president of the country. her answer was that she relied on our intelligence analysis. i don't understand why she would not have at least qualified her re
the perhaps more cyberattacks that are maybe something like an armed attack under the u.n. charter conceivably i suppose, even inactive or, though that is debatable at this point to whether we seen anything like that today. i put a few appear that are relevant. computer network attack talking about that encompass different things. computer network exploitation is basically a to infiltrate a computer network for any of the purposes i just described. it may be some of armed attack. maybe it is for criminal activities and you're hoping to be surreptitious about which are doing. babies are espionage and again are hoping to be surreptitious. so i have an example of how these concepts interrelate to one another and how if you're in the business of computer network defense, you're trying to defend networks at your company. if you look at this from a policy perspective for the united states, for example i'm how vulnerable is the united states? how vulnerable is our critical infrastructure, nuclear power plants, things like that. you quickly see that an infiltration into the network might be to steal a
for the past four u.n. ambassadors to the u.n. mohammed morsi was something of a hero to the united states when he helped broker that cease-fire between israel and hamas in gaza. now what is going on. >> my, what six weeks will do. six weeks ago we had president obama saying that egypt and morsi wasn't really an enemy and they weren't really our friend. wasn't an ally. six weeks later we see secretary of state hillary clinton gushing over the fact that egypt was able to broker this cease-fire. clearly, jon, the cease-fire is great news, and i think that the egyptian president does deserve credit for brokering this. he went in to gaza, he tried to do what he could. i think most observers were a little bit uncomfortable with wh he was saying inside gaza and i think he came down on hamas' side a little bit too much. he is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. we were a little bit concerned with his actions. but then when the cease-fire happened secretary of state hillary clinton stood next to him and really just gushed over the fact that he was able to produce this cease-fire. then you saw -- jon: d
when he gave his speech at the u.n. and he had this graphic illustration of the problem, he created what was a new threshold for them. for the previous, i don't know, six to 12 months, israelis have been focusing on what they called immunity. the result of immunity. what you mean by that was the death and the breath and the hardening of the nuclear program they face an existential threat and have the military option to deal with it. so they are saying under a point at which they own immunity is going to kick in, he was saying this is going to be the end of 2012. he has changed that and has said it has been pushed back eight to 10 months. when the prime minister was in new york, he focused not only on his own immunity, but the point at which iranians would cross the threshold where they would have the ability to build a nuclear weapon and you wouldn't be able to do anything about it. and he was suggesting that that would be when they had one at 20%. that is a limited definition. the issue for him was to define in a way, it also pushed off into the middle of 2013. they came up with di
there between israel and hamas had nothing to do with yesterday's vote at the u.n. where mahmoud abbas won his bid for the upgrade here. here's how the vote came down. >> the voting has been completed. please log the machine. 138 countries voted yes, and there were only nine no's. you and i have been talking about this the last couple of days anticipating that this was going to happen here. this was a big blow to the united states and israel that warned, look, don't go there, don't do this, and we heard from the ambassador, u.s. ambassador to u.n. susan rice immediately after the vote. i want you to see what she said. >> today's unfortunate and counter productive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. that is where the united states voted against it. today's grand pronouncements will soon fade, and the palestinian people will wake up tomorrow and find that little about their lives has changed. >> how is it all these other countries, how is it that the -- the united states got it right here? >> mrs. rice is correct. ms. rice is correct, and in terms of -- it's not going to be
is in carnegie, pennsylvania. hi, patrick. caller: happy thanksgiving. i am profoundly un-optimistic about the state of our economy and their future. when i read about the entire presbyterian church, the methodist church, the evangelical lutheran church wanting to end all relationships with the state of israel, i think our country -- we are literally being occupied by a foreign government by the state of israel. i have to tell you, when you look at the economic apartheid on wall street where the american people are treading on one platform while the zionist regime in control of our country is trading, we are becoming a nation that is completely and utterly occupied. host: that was patrick from pennsylvania. hi, judy. caller: hi. i just want to say that my husband dave and i are very optimistic about the future. we are happy that the president won. our concern -- your last caller was talking about religion and the churches. we don't see why they should be playing a part in our government and big we are concerned about the separation of church and state. we are also concerned about the racia
relations with israel, the role of the security council and in the city council in the u.n. almost everything important is at stake in this. this is the most critical and most dangerous situation that the administration will be facing in the next year. looking at in the wind while this year is critical we have to realize this isn't all about some misunderstanding or fixable problem with iran not to getting about its civil nuclear program or even its nuclear weapons program colliding with the international community. these are all manifestations of the long term confrontation that we and the rest of the region has with iran at least since the 1970's and this confrontation will go on regardless of whether we get a nuclear deal or have a strike to prevent iran from moving to that nuclear weapons capability. we are going to have to deal with this problem over the longer term just as we have the last 30 years because it flows from kuran's view of its role in the region and the inconsistency of the view with the view of the other countries in the region, our values and our role both in t
, the role of the security council, and our role in the security council in the u.n. system. almost everything that's important is at stake with this. this is the most critical and most dangerous situation that the administration will be facing in the next year. looking at it, though, and while this year is critical, as den sis said, we have to realize this is not all about some misunderstanding or some fixable problem with iran not getting it about itself civil nuclear program or colliding with the international community. these are all manifestations of the long term confrontation that we, and the rest of the west and the region had with iran as least since the 1970s. this will go on, regardless of whether we get a nuclear deal or we have a strike to prevent iran from moving to the nuclear weapons capability. we're going to have to deal with this problem over the long term just as we have over the last 30 years because it flows from iran's view of its role in the region and inconsistency of that view with the view of the other countries in the region, our values, and our role, bot
we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- weaknessy, obama's overseas, his inability to stand up to this rising asian power. the united states and china are so intertwined economically that is a very hard to start any kind of a fight between the two ove
clear at the meeting at the u.n. in september, and, of course, now we have very interesting results from two states here from washington state and from colorado, and in addition to the 17 or 18 that where marijuana is used for medicinal purposes and two states to be used for recreational purposes, and we have pressure from the region joined with pressure and trends and shift in public opinion within the united states, which i think contributes an adds to greater pressure on the administration at the national level to rethink its policy and drugs, clearly having a negative effect or perceived to having negative effects in terms of crime and violence and corruption in many countries in latin america. here, again, i think the obama administration would probably say that there's some things to move forward on the issue, talking about shared responsibility, but i think despite changes in the discourse, the elements of the policy have been pretty unchanged until now, but this, again, this opens some possibilities. the reaction in mexico will be critical where this goes, and president-elect wil
in september at the u.n., and now we have interesting results from two states here from washington state and from colorado. in addition to the many states -- i think there are 17 or 18 -- where marijuana can be used for medicinal purposes. in these two states, they can be used for recreational purposes. there we have the pressure from the region joined with some of the pressure and trends in shift in public opinion in the u.s., which i think will contribute an ad to greater pressure on the administration at the national level to rethink its policy on drugs, which is clearly having very negative effects are perceived to having negative effects in terms of crime, violence, and corruption in many countries in latin america. i think obama administration will probably say it has done some things to move forward on this issue, talking about shared responsibility, but i think despite some changes in the discourse, the essential elements of the policy have been pretty unchanged until now. again, this does open some -- possibilities. the reaction in mexico will be particularly critical to see whe
clear -- most recently at the general assembly meeting in september at the u.n., and now we have interesting results from two states here from washington state and from colorado. in addition to the many states -- i think there are 17 or 18 -- where marijuana can be used for medicinal purposes. in these two states, they can be used for recreational purposes. there we have the pressure from the region joined with some of the pressure and trends in shift in public opinion in the u.s., which i think will contribute an ad to greater pressure on the administration at the national level to rethink its policy on drugs, which is clearly having very negative effects or perceived to having negative effects in terms of crime, violence, and corruption in many countries in latin america. i think obama administration will probably say it has done some things to move forward on this issue, talking about shared responsibility, but i think despite some changes in the discourse, the essential elements of the policy have been pretty unchanged until now. again, this does open some -- possibilities. t
are only a minority? in other words, when others call the shots. can we reform the u.n., the g20 system, and other international institutions including the world bank, an antiquated voting system, except her in a way that the rising powers, when they asked for a greater share of the cake, they find that acceptable, legitimate, and fair. i think that is a huge task that we should commit ourselves to, but with a sense of confidence. so far i think there is no reason for us to believe that we have run out of steam. >> i feel like them back in the u.s. election with my hedge fund buddies talking about the travails of the 1%. let's broaden the discussion, bring in some of are more diverse voices. anybody want to enter the conversation, just raise your hand. alcoa new. we have people with mike sue want to colony. the state your name and affiliation and ask a question record comment. >> thank you. i would like the fast you the following question. you have mentioned a number of, let's say, tools with such as several weapons, such as drones and special forces. there just tools. to achieve what?
by the populationst un is against us? >> that is the answer i have just given you.r tha the rules of engagement are different but i cannot make specific judgment with your written a vice but it is the sole reason it is a complex tapestry of a number of reasons. >> if i might their recent statistics. and the north atlantic council always takes an interest.on the latest report suggested % of civil 80% of casualties are caused by the insurgents to be at issued did to the outer forces. >> don't misunderstand. my question relates 20,063rd 2007. >> those in civilian casualties there is still blamed for the level oftime violence sometimes precarious. >> as soon as there is any indit indication but local a visit maybebility and casualty. so that maybe the environment attributed. >> with a final remark protecting the civilian population we have that protection that would not be t viable the. >> general, deciding the eules of engagement with the north atlantic council and does direct that the rules of engagd does direct that the rules of engagement and there itti and i possibility of as civilian casualty
's unparalleled success. at the u.n. last year, president obama spoke strongly about this thing that the u.s. quote will support a free and open internet so individuals have the information to make up their own minds. no one has been a more forceful advocate of the economic and social opportunities of the open internet and secretary of state hillary clinton. who delivered a landmark speech on internet freedom in 2010 when she said that one of the fundamental freedoms of the internet age was the freedom to connect. the idea that government should not prevent people from connecting to the internet, to websites, or to each other. now, internet freedom is sometimes cited as an obstacle to addressing the issues of cybersecurity and intellectual property theft. i disagree with that. i disagree not because i question the importance of issues of the magnitude of the threat. a very serious problem we have to address. but i believe based on my experience that we can address those issues without undermining the core values like internet freedom and privacy. we've put our money where our mouths are at
was un-american. there are a lot of people in ohio that think it was very much an american, pro-american vote and they're going to reward brown for that >> let's go back to our ohio line. jim is an independent. you're on with congressman tim ryan. >> good morning, congressman ryan. i was raised in akron, left goodyear to teach in 1976. now i live in stark county and i drive a jeep and i'm a supporter of senator brown and our president. and i met you at an sb-5 rally back last year. i was very sorry, of course john boccieri, who i think you know pretty well, is no longer serving us but i hope he'll be back. in line with that, the redistricting issue too in ohio. i wish yud speak a little bit to the pathology of how these districts are being gerrymandered and -- specifically in -- an issue two in ohio. >> we're supporting issue two, i'm supporting issue two which creates a citizen panel to redraw the congressional districts and the legislative districts. >> is that on the ballot as well? >> it's on the ballot as well. it takes the pen out of the hands of politicians, both democrat
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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